September 18, 2014

Test tomorrow over Chapter 7.

Don’t forget to study math properties.

Commutative Property of Addition—if the order of terms changes, the sum stays the same. 12 + a = a + 12

Associative Property of Addition—when the grouping of terms changes, the sum stays the same. 5 + (8 + b) = (5 + 8) + b

Identity Property of Addition—The sum of 0 and any number is that number.
0 + c = c

Commutative Property of Multiplication—if the order of factors changes, the product stays the same.
d x 9 = 9 x d

Associative Property of Multiplication—when the grouping of factors changes, the products stays the same.
11 x (3 x e) = (11 x 3) x e

Identity Property of Multiplication—the product of 1 and any number is that number. 1 x f = f

Distributive Property—multiplying a sum by a number is the same as multiplying each term by the number and then adding the products.
5 x (g + 9) = (5 x g) + (5 x 9)

Math Homework Tips for Week of February 24, 2014

Divide Decimals by Whole Numbers—When dividing decimals by a whole number, just bring the decimal point up into the quotient and divide like any other number.

Divide with Decimals—When dividing decimals by a decimal, the decimal point is moved to the right in the divisor and the dividend the same number of places and then brought up into the quotient.

Algebraic Expressions- An algebraic expression is a mathematical phrase that includes at least one variable. A variable is a letter or symbol that stands for one or more numbers. Students will be asked to write algebraic expression for word expressions.

For example: 11 more than e is 11 + e.

Identify Parts of Expressions- In this lesson, students will be asked to identify parts of an expression.

For example: 5m + 2n
The expression is the sum of 2 terms. The first term is the product of 5 and m. The second term is the product of 2 and n. Word expression: the sum of 5 times m and 2 times n.

Evaluate Algebraic Expressions and Formulas—When evaluating algebraic expression, substitute numbers for the variables and then follow the order of operations.

For example: Evaluate 25 + 9w when w = 8.

25 + (9 x 8) = 25 + 72 = 97

Homework Tips for Week of February 17, 2014

Adding and Subtracting Decimals-When adding and subtracting decimals make sure to line up the decimals points before adding or subtracting and then just bring down the decimal point into the answer.

For example: 2.567
+ 21.3__
23.867

Multiplying Decimals—When multiplying by decimals, just multiply as if the decimal isn’t there. After you get the product, count the number of digits that are behind the decimals points. Then, count from right to left in the product that same number and place the decimal point.

Divide Decimals by Whole Numbers—When dividing decimals by a whole number, just bring the decimal point up into the quotient and divide like any other number.

Divide with Decimals—When dividing decimals by a decimal, the decimal point is moved to the right in the divisor and the dividend the same number of places and then brought up into the quotient.

Week of February 10-14, 2014

Chapter 1 Mid-Chapter Study Guide

Greatest Common Factor or GCF-the greatest factor that two or more numbers have in common. The factors of two numbers is less than or equal to the numbers.

Least Common Multiple or LCM-the least number that is a common multiple of two or more numbers. The least common multiple of two numbers is greater than or equal to the numbers.

Prime Number—has only two factors, 1 and itself.

Prime Factorization—the number written as a product of all of its prime factors.

Be able to solve problems that require finding the greatest common factor and using the distributive property to answer questions.

Chapter 7 Mid-Chapter Study Guide

Term—the parts of the expression that are separated by an addition or subtraction sign.

Variable—a letter or symbol that stands for one or more numbers.

Coefficient—a number that is multiplied by a variable.

Exponent—a number that tells how many times a number called the base is used as a repeated factor.

Numerical Expression—a mathematical phrase that uses only numbers and operation symbols.

Algebraic Expression—a mathematical phrase that includes at least one variable.

Order of Operations—Parenthesis, Exponents, Multiplication, Division, Addition, Subtraction

Homework Tips for the Week of January 13, 2014

This week we will be working on divisibility rules and prime/composite numbers. Your child should have a page with all of the divisibility rules on it (apple page). For extra help at home, ask your child to tell you how they know if a number is divisible by each number. For example,
Parent: “A number is divisible by two when . . .”
Child: “it ends in an even number like 0, 2, 4, 6, or 8.”
We also will be working on prime and composite numbers. Prime numbers are numbers that only have 2 factors—1 and itself. For example: The number 3 is prime because its only factors are 1 and 3 (1 x 3 = 3). However 4 is composite because its factors are 1, 2, and 4. ( 1 x 4 = 4 and 2 x 2 = 4).
Prime Factorization–A factor tree is one method of determining the prime factorization of a number. The method is based on writing a number as a product of two factors, each greater than 1. Each of these factors is then written as a product of two factors, each greater than 1. The process continues until each factor at the end of a “branch” is a prime number. Every whole number greater than 1 has a unique prime factorization. The prime factorization of 40 is 2 x 2 x 2 x 5, regardless of the pair of factors used in the first step.

Math Homework Tips for Week of November 25, 2013

Ordered Pair Relationships—The four regions of the coordinate plane is called quadrants and are separated by the two axes. They are numbers with Roman numerals I, II, III, and IV. By knowing the signs of the ordered pair, you can decide which quadrant the point is located. For example:
Quadrant I = (+, +)
Quadrant II = (-, +)
Quadrant III = (-, -)
Quadrant IV = (+, -)

Math Homework Tips for Week of November 4, 2013

Math Homework Tips
Rational Numbers and the Number Line—Rational numbers are described as numbers that can be written as a/b, where a and b are integers and b is not equal to 0. Rational numbers can be negative. Decimals, fractions, and integers are all rational numbers.

Solutions of Inequalities—An inequality is a mathematical sentence that compares two expressions using the symbol , .
A solution of an inequality is a value of a variable that makes the inequality true. Inequalities can have more than one solution.

For the inequality a < 3, a = 1 is a solution because 1 is less than 3. a = 3 is not a solution because 3 is not less than 3.

Write Inequalities—Here are some ways to express each inequality symbol in words.
< less than, under, not as much as
greater than, over, more than
> greater than or equal to, at least, no less than

Math Homework Tips for October 21-25, 2013

Math Homework Tips
Divide Mixed Numbers—Rewrite mixed numbers as improper fractions. For example: 9 1/3 = 28/3. After changing the mixed numbers into improper fractions, then bring down the first fraction, change from division to multiplication, and use the reciprocal of the last fraction. Simplify before multiplying and then multiply.
Example:
9 1/3 divided by 1 1/6 becomes
28/3 divided by 7/6
28/3 X 6/7 = 4/1 x 2/1 = 8/1 or 8

Solve Multiplication and Division Equations—To solve multiplication and division equations: First, get the variable by itself on one side of the equal side by performing the inverse operation. For example:
3d = 21
d = 21 divided by 3
d = 7
Check by replacing the variable with the answer. 3 x 7 = 21
21 = 21

d divided by 15 = 4
d= 4 x 15
d = 60
60 divided by 15 = 4
4 = 4

Homework Tips

Simplify Factors—One way is to simplify the product by dividing the numerator and the denominator by the greatest common factor. For example: 14/50 divide numerator and denominator by 2 = 7/25

Another way is to simplify before multiplying.
For example: 5/8 X 14/15. Look at the numbers that are diagonal from each other and divide by the greatest common factor. In this example, 5 will go into 5 one time and 5 will go into 15 three times. 2 will go into 8 four times and 2 will go into 14 seven times.
1/4 X 7/3 = 7/12